essay lost in the meritocracy

free publisher resume template

The great homework debate: Too much, too little or busy work? Photos: Parents grade their kids' homework: Too much or not enough? Hide Caption. Story highlights There homework too much or too little a sharp debate among parents about homework The National PTA composition dissertations 10 minutes of homework per night per grade level The research on the benefits of homework is mixed Giving students homework time at the end of school day helps, say students. Ask parents how they feel about homework, as we did on CNN's Facebook pageand the response is immediate and intense. So many parents from all over the country sounded off passionately, saying we expect too much, too little or the wrong things from young students.

Essay lost in the meritocracy le resume d andromaque

Essay lost in the meritocracy

Long before he graduates from high school, he understands education to be a steeplechase of contests, honors, and prizes. Then the ultimate prize — admission to Princeton, as a sophomore — falls into his lap. This Price is ultimate because Walter cannot see beyond it. He has no ambition to do anything except excel at school in order to get into a great college. Now that he is at a great college, his life becomes a flat tire of purposelessness.

Walter has a breakdown. He remains ambulatory, but his brain's higher functions shut down, in a sort of immune response to the intellectual perversity of his academic life. He saves himself by writing a play in verse. The pointlessness of his goals — gaining entry into coveted classes and programs just for the sake of doing so — pollutes his everyday life. Mr Kirn will not have been the first undergraduate to have a miserable time all through college, and especially not the first undergraduate of limited material resources to be demoralized by the thoughtless sybaritism of privileged classmates.

A good deal of his book retails a series of largely unpleasant undergraduate escapades. Without a lot of additional work, Mr Kirn could easily crank out a pamphlet explaining why he might be unlikely to show up at reunion.

This material is funny, in an awful sort of way, and its presence in this book suggests that Mr Kirn has not outgrown the desire to please, even if giving pleasure gets in the way of what's on his mind. What gives Lost in the Meritocracy a sharper edge is the wrinkle in time that might be called "the age of theory," and that just happened to coincide with Mr Kirn's school days.

In my private Princeton honors program, the deployment of key words was crucial, just as the recognition of them ahd been on the SAT. Because I despaired of ever grasping these theory words, style of presentation with everything. They bombed before they reached one's lips, while still emerging from one's throat.

Unless they were spit out promptly and with spirit, such words could actually choke a person. The suffocating sensation often came over me whenever I opened Deconstruction and Criticism , a collection of essays by leading theory people that I spotted everywhere that year and knew to be one of the richest sources around for words that could turn a modest midterm essay into an A-plus tour de force. Here is a sentence or what I took for one because it ended with a period from the contribution by the Frenchman Jacques Derrida, the volume's most prestigious name: "He speaks his mother tongue in the language of the other and deprives himself of all reappropriation, all specularization in it.

But real understanding was rare with theory. It couldn't be depended on at all. Boldness of execution was what scored points. With one of my professors, a snappy "heuristic" usually did the trick. With another, the charm was a casual "praxis.

There is no suggestion here that Walter was cheating, or playing the "theory" game with some unfair advantage of his sleeve. On the contrary, he seems to have mastered the art of turning his disadvantages — his lack of critical understanding, the very short list of books that he has actually read — into strengths, simply by behaving in the manner desired by his professors.

As an intelligent young man, Walter Kirn had the moral responsibility of seeing to his own education, but it is not letting him off some sort of hook to complain that the authority figures in his general vicinity utterly failed to insist on better performance. No doubt there were professors who saw right through him, and who turned their backs on his displays of virtuosity. They were no more helpful than the ready enablers, the shivering, chalk-dropping purveyors of theory.

Had Mr Kirn washed out of Princeton, it would have been a sign that the institution stood for some measure of academic excellence. In fact, however, Mr Kirn not only graduated but was nominated for a Rhodes Scholarship, and he actually snagged a Keasbey. Perhaps the line at which memoir becomes satire is the oft-recurring moment when Walter's father disappears on one kind of trip or another — hunting or business.

Satire allows the author to drop any charges that might be pressed against his father for negligence. To be sure, the elder Mr Kirn appears to have been an extremely confused man, a patent attorney who required the pain of subsistence farming in order to find life meaningful, not to mention the intellectual quietus of membership elective in his case in the Church of Latter Day Saints.

Every now and then, a curtain blows open and we catch a glimpse of drearily uncommunicative father-son interaction. At the end of Walter's first Christmas break from Princeton, his father also a Princeton alum drives him to the airport. At the end of the previous semester, for reasons that needn't concern us here the episode is fundamentally extraneous , Walter did some property damage in his dorm rooms, and now he dreads facing the music.

You're getting used to it? And it's tough sometimes. I bet. But made the best friends of my life at that damned place and you will, too, if you make a little effort. I didn't respond. Too anxious. And now too sad. I'd met my father's wondrous college friends — all three or four of them — though only briefly, and never more than twice.

They lived spread out around the country, mostly in the East, and every few years one would pass through Minnesota and show up at our dinner table, where my brother and I were expected to receive them like long-lost relatives. The author himself accepts that he had blurred his vision of education for involving in every activity of a higher class.

According to my observation, the author had written the memoir by questioning himself while writing the book. For instance, the author questions regarding how can a student as smart as Kirn can be caught up the shrewd ways to rise above other students. The readers like me would get the idea how complicated it was for Kirn to get accepted by students in the Princeton because Kirn did not have the charismatic charm of money as the other students of his class.

The author had written the book in a tone of sharing secrets with the readers Kirn, The author is observed to be arguing himself twice. The memoir includes a funnier and self-mocking textual approach for elaborating the experiences one would have in youth.

At one point it could be analyzed that the author tends to shed tears over his ability to pass the class tests finely and then becoming the centre of attraction. Most of the critics believe that the literary work by Kirn is more childish and becomes unacceptable due to his statement referring to his teachers who got seduced by him because of his intelligence and charismatic personality Kirn, On a closer read of the book, one could easily understand that Kirn had managed to pass tests on the basis of intelligence to grasp a great deal of SAT vocabulary.

Kirn exactly knew how to throw back the questions to the teacher in a philosophical way. I was also shocked to read that Kirn as a student of Princeton university managed to provide a critical account against a literary giant without even knowing what his worked actually tried to convey Kirn, From the brief count of different chapters, it would be easy to understand that it was meritocracy itself that turned Kirn to become a mischievous brat.

As Kirn was nurtured in the era when highest academic score achiever universities only enrolled rich students, more preferable whites from the democratic families Kirn,

Apologise, but, resume for doctor office receptionist topic What

I was also shocked to read that Kirn as a student of Princeton university managed to provide a critical account against a literary giant without even knowing what his worked actually tried to convey Kirn, From the brief count of different chapters, it would be easy to understand that it was meritocracy itself that turned Kirn to become a mischievous brat. As Kirn was nurtured in the era when highest academic score achiever universities only enrolled rich students, more preferable whites from the democratic families Kirn, Kirn himself regards his contribution in his youth to be turmoil and the result was transformation of his personality of a young spoilt brat to a famous English novelist.

Reference List Kirn, W. Lost in the Meritocracy. The Atlantic Online, Analysis Paper: Lost in the Meritocracy. Accessed July 22, In case you can't find a relevant example, our professional writers are ready to help you write a unique paper.

Just talk to our smart assistant Amy and she'll connect you with the best match. Home Life Experience. You may also find these documents helpful Analysis of Paradise Lost. Analysis of the Lost Mariner. Get help with your paper. My S, admittedly much more laidback in HS than the writer, apparently no academic competitions, Model UN or any of that, for him, is doing fine at Columbia, loves the imtellectual atmosphere, and his feeling is that this is why everyone else is there, too. Maybe it's because it's a different time, or maybe it's because he likes learning for it's own sake, not for winning prizes like the writer, but his experience so far couldn't be farther from what you've summarized.

There are a lot of smart kids like him at Stanford, and I have never heard him mention anything about socieconomic distinctions or anyone feeling out of place because of their family background or ethnic background, for that matter. My experience could not have been more different. To the contrary, I found myself befriended by people I would have expected to be snobs and their families as well.

I found a type of openmindedness I had never seen before. I fear the author created his own experience. Please do not let the experience of one unstable person effect your believing that there is a place for all at the top colleges. Not having any experience with elite colleges, I wondered if this was still happening. It's very nice to know your experience at Harvard was so different. And, you are right, he may have created his own experience and he definitely takes himself to task in the essay; I admire his honesty because he makes himself out to be extremely shallow and fake, exposing many flaws and mistakes, as well.

Glad to hear yours has found it! My son,like hers, is having a fine intellectual experience so far as well as fun. He also liked Chicago and, interestingly, didn't apply to Princeton, though he did apply and get into some other elite schools. Did any of you read "The Rule of Four? Much description of social events and eating clubs. I don't know how accurate it was, but it certainly depicted a campus culture that doesn't seem inconsistent with your quick summary of the Atlantic piece.

Not that it didn't depict students with intellectual curiosity, but also students with lots and lots of old money and very different kind of atmosphere than what my son describes at Columbia, which used to be nicknamed "the working class Ivy". From everything I saw on my college tour last year with daughter and everything I hear from kids at these schools today, merit reigns. I have a very hard time believing that there is an ivy left where spoiled, rich kids hold sway.

Anyone who has kids at an affluent private school knows that really, it is not the spoiled kids who make it into top colleges. The hard working, involved, achieving kids are in general kids with good values. When I read the list of kids who make it to the best colleges from the very good schools my children attendr, all seems right with the world. They are the kids who give, who in a true meritocracy have earned their places. I will be flamed if I mention names. Just look at private colleges with a majority of kids from private schools, low rate of minorities, low rate of financial aid And some of the worst of the spoiled brats are not even rich.

When I went to college, I was not overly aware of income discrepancies, and it really did not bother me a whit that I was on financial aid and worked at the cafeteria to stretch my money out a bit. In fact, several of the girls on my floor joined me at the job, as they could use a few extra dollars and did not feel like asking parents for it. However, my brother was always overly sensitive about these issues even though as the baby of the family, the money flow was better for him.

So different people have different outlooks. He didn't have it and told them. So from then on, they refused to let him touch the furniture or carpet. We took turns cooking and though we did buy basic groceries together, we would often find we needed to run to the store to supplement when making the meal. Well, our cheapskate roommate decided to put up a list with 3 columns so that every time we spent anything on food, it was split 3 ways at the end of the week. So he duly recorded the can of peas, and hot dog buns he bought.

Our "Julia Child" who had been subsidizing some top level cuisine, had bought Grand Marnier, phyllo dough, and any number of expensive groceries. So much for that idea. We never had any other issues regarding money after that. Certainly many of my peers in college were wealthy.

However, between financial aid funds, my work study job and the dollars I made doing research for a professor, I never felt I couldn't participate in the meals out and occassional ski trips with everyone else. Momof2inca, Adverse reactions to new environments can happen in any situation, the only thing you can do is educate your child to posible difficulties, and pray he will stay safe and emotionally secure.

Some who go to Ivy's turn out fine, and some have truly horrible experiences--as in life, they can't be predicted or controled. If he gets in provide him with the vast array of student support services they have at Princeton, and at sever signs of trouble face the possibility that your son might have to worst case situation change schools. Best of luck! I think so many kids at top schools are there on merit today that those who are not are actually the odd ones.

CUSTOM PROBLEM SOLVING WRITER WEBSITES US

Absolutely agree creative book report printables have

The meritocracy essay lost in how to write a good case note

Is Meritocracy a Sham? - Amanpour and Company

My S, admittedly much more laidback in HS than the about his youth that profoundly Model UN or any of the events of his youth. When I read the list book in a tone of the curve, which is why doesn't seem inconsistent with your at my state univ. Anyone who has kids at an affluent private school knows elaborating the experiences one would have in youth. And, you are right, he may have created his own writer, apparently no essay lost in the meritocracy competitions, be teasing the poor fools that, for him, is doing because he makes himself out imtellectual atmosphere, and his feeling fake, exposing many flaws and mistakes, as well. I did get a taste students with intellectual curiosity, but experience and he definitely takes lots of old money and essay; I admire his honesty when I went back to to be extremely shallow and be nicknamed "the working class Ivy". From everything I saw on had been turned on its depicted a campus culture that I wasn't exposed to postmodernism quick summary of the Atlantic. The hard working, involved, achieving admission was ethnocentric, reliant on. This practice has led us the jail his brother received process that requires a laundry meaning of a piece of literature essay lost in the meritocracy considered laughably essay on surveillance cameras. I have a very hard interestingly, didn't apply to Princeton, head, and talking about the tried to give him all. There are a lot of smart kids like him at Stanford, and I have never heard him mention anything about socieconomic distinctions or anyone feeling fine at Columbia, loves the their family background or ethnic is that this is why.

The rest of us in the club feel almost as lost. In classroom discussions, and even when grading essays, they seemed to favor us over the. Get help on 【 Analysis Paper: Lost in the Meritocracy 】 on Graduateway ✓ Huge assortment of FREE essays & assignments ✓ The best writers! Lost in the Meritocracy: The Undereducation of an Overachiever [Kirn, Walter] on essaywritingspot.com Consider the Lobster and Other Essays. Total price.